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Science Says Lasting Relationships Come Down To 2 Basic Traits

Science says lasting relationships come down to—you guessed it—kindness and generosity.
Every day in June about 13,000 American couples will say “I do,” committing to a lifelong relationship that will be full of friendship, joy, and love that will carry them forward to their final days on this earth. Except, of course, it doesn’t work out that way for most people.

The majority of marriages fail, only three in ten remain in healthy, happy marriages, as psychologist Ty Tashiro points out in his book "The Science of Happily Ever After."


Walking Home

Erika Swyler

I wore my mother's shoes to feel as if she was walking with me, helping me through those first days of her absence.


No Time to Think

Kate Murphy, July 25, 2014, image: Clayton Brothers

ONE of the biggest complaints in modern society is being overscheduled, overcommitted and overextended. Ask people at a social gathering how they are and the stock answer is “super busy,” “crazy busy” or “insanely busy.” Nobody is just “fine” anymore.


Why You Will Marry the Wrong Person

Alain de Botton, May 28, 2016, New York Times, Opinion, Image: Marion Fayolle

IT’S one of the things we are most afraid might happen to us. We go to great lengths to avoid it. And yet we do it all the same: We marry the wrong person.


To Stop Procrastinating, Start by Understanding the Emotions Involved

Time management goes only so far; the emotional reasons for delay must also be addressed

 Shirley S. Wang , Updated Aug. 31, 2015

Chronic procrastination is an emotional strategy for dealing with stress, researchers say, and it can lead to difficulties in relationships, jobs, finances and health. 


After the Children Have Grown

By Madeline Levine, May 11, 2013, New York Times, image: Ruth Gwily

LATELY, I’ve been having some trouble figuring out exactly who I am. Or, more precisely, who I will be going forward. Parts of me have changed over the years. But my core identity has not budged in three decades. I’m a mother. With my youngest son about to graduate from college, I find myself increasingly unhinged from that most fundamental view of myself. 


What Your Therapist Is Really Thinking

Yes, therapists sometimes get bored; excerpts from an interview with psychotherapist Paul Hokemeyer